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WHY PERMANENCE MATTERS IN AVOIDANCE CREDITS

Permanence in carbon credits means making sure that the stored carbon remains in place for a long time. It's like ensuring the lasting impact of efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The idea is to prevent the released carbon from going back into the atmosphere, securing the benefits of offsetting projects. 

If permanence is not assured in carbon credit initiatives, it poses a significant risk to the overall effectiveness of climate mitigation efforts. Without certainty that the stored carbon will remain sequestered, the environmental benefits achieved through projects become compromised. 

Additionally, this diminishes the credibility of offsetting programs whose economics rely on the market value of carbon credits. Investors and buyers in carbon markets rely on the stability of these credits, expecting sustained emission reductions. Ensuring the permanence of carbon sequestration becomes pivotal not only for the environmental success of these initiatives but also for maintaining a robust and reliable carbon credit market.

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HOW TO ASSURE PERMANENCE AND
ASSESS THE RISKS OF REVERSIBILITY ?

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CURRENT BEST PRACTICES

Project developers employ a multifaceted approach to meticulously address permanence in carbon offset initiatives.

Firstly, they undertake a comprehensive risk assessment to estimate the reversibility risks and establish a permanence strategy. Developers evaluate both natural and anthropogenic factors that could jeopardize the long-term sequestration of carbon. These assessments encompass a wide range of potential threats. By thoroughly understanding and quantifying these risks, developers can implement targeted measures to mitigate and manage them effectively.

Then, developers utilize monitoring systems, often leveraging advanced technologies such as satellite imagery, to uphold real-time surveillance of project areas. 

Lastly, project developers implement a proactive measure by establishing buffer pools to address the risk of reversals. These pools serve as a dedicated reserve of carbon credits, specifically set aside to counteract any potential losses due to reversals during the project's lifespan. Beyond acting as a safeguard against unforeseen challenges, this financial mechanism underscores the commitment to maintaining the permanence of carbon sequestration.  

PERMANENCE IN THE CASE OF REDD+

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HOW WOULD LEAVIT DEAL WITH PERMANENCE ?

Ensuring the permanence of LEAVIT credits requires the establishment of a robust legal and regulatory framework.

 

Paramount to this effort is the creation of international agreements or treaties, binding participating nations or entities to steadfast, long-term commitments. Within this legal framework, specific conditions dictating the untouched status of oil reserves must be outlined.

 

Any deviation from these conditions would trigger consequential measures, such as the retirement of carbon credits or the imposition of financial penalties. This meticulous approach sets the foundation for a secure and enduring commitment to preserving oil reserves, reinforcing the integrity of the associated carbon benefits over time.

The risks associated with reversibility are distinctly non-natural in the context of leaving oil in the ground. Oil remains beneath the surface as long as it remains unexplored by drilling activities.

 

The potential for reversibility arises primarily from human actions, particularly the possibility of governments breaching contractual agreements and choosing to exploit these reserves. The intricate interplay of financial interests introduces a layer of vulnerability, where the economic advantages of oil extraction may tempt governments to reconsider their commitment to keeping reserves untouched.

If you're seeking additional information on:

  • International and regulatory frameworks

  • Strategies to mitigate the risk of government flip-flopping

  • Transferring mineral rights to international nature conservation NGOs

  • Quantification of the risks of reversibility

  • Ex-post crediting mechanisms to ensure ongoing financial commitment from governments

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